Hollywoods politisches Kino: Die feine Linie zwischen bildlich darstellter Gewalt und Anstiftung zu Gewalt – L’Ordre

Hollywoods politisches Kino:
Die
feine Linie zwischen bildlich darstellter Gewalt und Anstiftung zu Gewalt

Political cinema and the fine line between depicting and inciting violence – L’Ordre.

Movies are considered a part of the arts in modern liberal democracies, and are not officially subjected to state censorship. In reality, I would argue they are subject to state and corporate censorship, although it consists of selectively hyping and showing the forms of political cinema that are most beneficial to the establishment and cutting out parts of movies that are uncomfortable to the present regime and its corporate backers.

Possibly the greatest figure currently alive in political cinema today, I believe, is Oliver Stone, although I regret not studying political cinema and Stone’s contributions in greater depth. Specifically, Stone’s approaching movie adaptation of The Snowden Files is almost certain to enrage the US political establishment by accurately capturing the noble character of Edward Snowden’s actions in rebelling against the excesses of the surveillance state. I mention this, because of a subject I addressed in recent posts: that of The Interview movie which attempts to ridicule and provoke the North Korean government, as well as encourage and glamorize specific actions like assassination to overthrow the North Korean regime. The movie did cross the line from entertaining violence to actually inciting it, and this was the intention, as is clear in leaked emails exposing the intent of the movie’s producers.   ……

via Hollywoods politisches Kino: Die feine Linie zwischen bildlich darstellter Gewalt und Anstiftung zu Gewalt – L’Ordre.